Blade Boston

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Blade Boston

Designed to attract and cultivate the cities’ technical and creative elite - Blade Boston is the newest addition to the Boston Startup Community. Set against the Boston skyline, the space is equal parts startup habitat, gallery and event space. 

From the earliest conversation, it was evident that the founders had a very different vision and expressed a strong desire to create a groundbreaking technology experience. Conceptually, the environment needed to speed-up or slow down depending on time of day. iPads were custom programmed to provide control of individual room’s lighting, audio, projectors/TVs or programmed to be grouped together for parties and events. 

At its core, Blade is about encouraging collaboration. It is in this spirit, we recommended an open architecture to command and control. Especially, given the diversity of scenarios and devices and a variety of manufacturers, many of which, were simply not designed to talk to each other. That spirit of collaboration was also important as we worked with a team of electrical contractors, custom fabricators, stage sound/lighting and a visual FX artist to bring the founders vision to life. 

I loved every minute of working with Koncerted. These guys have a crazy wide range of skills, and they are fearless to try new things. I will use Koncerted again and again for any projects with custom TV, video, lighting, etc.
— Paul English. BLADE CEO & Cofounder

Work now play later.

For events and parties, all lighting and A/V controls are transferred to the VJ booth through a PIN protected admin panel. Once transferred, the individual remotes are locked out to ensure there are no distractions from the stage. The highpoint for our principal programmer came at the opening event, “seeing everyone dancing and enjoying the system in its entirety, was pretty amazing”.  

Anticipating how a system will be utilized is always a consideration. In the small hours of the morning, the system resets by initiating a sequence of commands to test and reboot. Controls are released back to the individual iPads in preparation for another productive day at Blade Boston. 

This project represents the most multi-layered project that Koncerted has attempted to date. With an equipment manifest in the hundreds, this was an opportunity our team savored. 

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the smallest of steps can add up

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the smallest of steps can add up

There is some truth in the often misquoted “You can’t manage what you can’t measure” mantra. This message can be applied to business, academics, and even health and wellness. At Koncerted, we apply this message to everything we do. Our back-of-house systems are designed to give us every necessary piece of intelligence needed to complete a job flawlessly. Our technicians are armed with all the details to ensure a perfect client engagement at every step in the process.

We have been experimenting with wearable products that track wellness statistics in our personal lives. Although the concept of wearable tech that integrates with our devices is only a few years old, it seems that you can’t turn your head without seeing it around us. From bracelets to sneakers to glasses, dozens of companies are popping up with new integrated ideas to streamline work, play, and health by implementing lifestyle-modifying hardware that track and measure calories burned, sleep quality, and distance walked using nothing more than a small wearable device and our smartphone. Many of these devices utilize social media to get some friendly competition stirring between your friends, family, and colleagues.

I have been using a bracelet in the dance studio that captures steps taken, distance traveled, and calories burned. Once calibrated to my stride, the pedometer is remarkably helpful at keeping track of movement during practice sessions.  It can generate a normalized “fitness score” for the day that I can use to track against other dancers. It becomes a motivational tool that serves double-duty to see how much time and energy other competitors are spending in their practices.

Our Boston office manager, an avid runner, has been using a different product for a few weeks now. “The thing I like most about it is when I go for runs I can see how far I’ve gone. Before using the bracelet I would just run by time if I wasn’t doing a route I knew. Now I can go on different routes still keep track of my distance. I also like the fact you can link to your friends and see how far they have run for the week. Its fun to compete with them and it makes running and walking more appealing than driving or taking the elevator.” 

For an easy and free introduction to the world of smartphone enabled fitness, check out the Nike+ for iPhone app to track distance, set challenges, and take your activity to the next level. Have a little fun with your music and create a pumped up playlist to listen to match.

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Addicted to Technology

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Addicted to Technology

I don’t know about you, but I spend a good part of my day on my iPhone, distracted from real-life interactions by a compulsion to constantly check email or monitor tweets and Facebook updates. 


Hello, I’m Blair and I’m a technoholic.
How do I know I’m addicted? When my kids wake up in the middle of the night – after I finally get them back to sleep – I often sneak a peek at my email before climbing back into bed myself. And so do lots of other folks. In fact, in this video and you’ll hear Guy Kawasaki publicly admit to sleeping with his phone and expressing his skepticism about de-teching. 


So I’m a technology addict. It’s not like it affects my family. 
Am I passing along my addiction to my kids? Like most children, my kids are a complete and utter delight. Except when it comes to their iPads. Then they’re tiny terrors. Guess who they learned this behavior from? 

Guilty as charged. After all, I run Koncerted. So of course my kids are overexposed to technology. But surely having your dad be a Technaholic must have it’s advantages. Thanks to my obsession with technology, it’s easier for my kids to keep up with their peers. And they NEED to know how to navigate an iPad, how to purchase apps, how to get to Netflix via AppleTV - right? 

Recently, my wife and I came face to face with the monsters we had created. I don’t know about you but when a princess dress-up game gets in the way of homework or having a conversation about the school day, that’s where I draw the line. Post apocalyptic tantrum was the point when we realized we’d lost control and simply had to wean our kids off their iPads. 


Parents – we’re in this together.
This made me wonder: is it all my fault? Are we the only parents who struggle with this? Definitely not. We did a little research and were relieved to find out that as this New York Times article shows, we’re not the only ones who are conflicted about setting a bad example while trying to loosen the grip technology has on our kids. 

The truth is, even if you’re not in the technology business, you don’t want your kids to get sucked into the technology vortex. But when you see your child making music using Toca Band or learning about the planets using Earth School, your attitude toward screen time changes…

Can you relate at all? Are you a tech addict and a parent? Do you set limits in your house? Is it acceptable when used to learn and explore the world but highly regulated otherwise? Except at 3am when there’s an important email to reply to…

The next meeting of Technoholics Anonymous meets next month right here on this blog. 

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At Koncerted, we love our food.

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At Koncerted, we love our food.

In fact we own it. We’re not embarrassed. We’re used to being labelled geeks, nerds, techies and much more, but you can add foodie to that list. We don’t mind. We know our guanciale from our pancetta, our fennel pollen from our fennel seeds, our elderflower cordial from our elderberry jam. Sure we’re better known for our precision network design or our automated lighting system for a home recording studio, or even a driveway sensor that honks a horn when a car pulls into your driveway, but in the quiet of a Tuesday afternoon in our Koncerted lab we tend to engage in heated debate over best methods for smoking shoulders of pork. Sometimes we’ll get emotional over the eternal question of whether to plop a dollop of crème fraîche or sour cream on a spicy bowl of pozolé, and don’t even get us started on choosing the best pasta cutter for freshly rolled pappardelle.

These days folks are finding fewer and fewer areas of their everyday existence where their tech doesn’t get involved. The Family Room TV, our favorite music, our cars, entertainment and most everything else have become intrinsically tied to our smartphones and tablets. Without us noticing it our kitchens and dining tables have followed suit, maybe even more than we realize. And this is why we love this stuff and what we do. We use our food to nourish; to connect with our families, relax and enjoy life. At almost every step of the journey our tech is there. From planning our next feast, choosing our seasonal goodies at the market, poring over the trendiest recipes and finally posting that humblebrag glory shot on Facebook for our jealous friends to drool over.

What’s cool is that the tech never seems to intrude or get in the way of the whole delicious process. Our iPhones can’t actually overcook that grass-fed Vermont rib eye (although once when Bluetooth disconnected that fancy iGrill app there was a horribly close shave). We really can’t blame that cool cocktail app if we put too much Curaćao in our next Thai basil margarita because we’ve already had one too many Thai basil margaritas (and who hasn’t?). Like an encouraging friend or a kitchen tested sage, our everyday tech guides us gently in the right gastronomic direction. It opens our eyes to culinary adventures we may have been too timid to venture on. It’s just possible that we may just end up looking like a more handsome and less foul mouthed Gordon Ramsay on Instagram, and that’s a meeting of tech and lifestyle we can get behind.

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Can a home be too smart for its own good?

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Can a home be too smart for its own good?

Every month brings more Smart Home product announcements. As you might imagine, at Koncerted, we’re always on the lookout for the latest and greatest technology and equipment. But more often than not, these new products seem to only work with themselves – not with what most people already have in their homes. This has the potential to create a stupefyingly confusing landscape for our clients. 

The term everyone is throwing around these days is “the Internet of Things” – meaning that we’re living in an era when everything in your house can be automated. Sounds appealing, doesn’t it? We all remember Rosie, the Jetsons’ robot maid. But we forget that Rosie was also automated. In fact, she was herself a computer. For the average human, being confronted with so much complexity is headache inducing – I need to remember how to do this with how many things? 

Who aside from a nerdy DIYer really wants to have to open 6 different applications to control the heat, turn off the lights, check in with the local weather station, and turn up the music? It’s one thing to appreciate the tech goodness each individual product may offer, but when you combine it with all of the other smart products in your home, it’s no wonder you feel a little punch drunk.

At Koncerted, before we recommend adding any new product, we first consider how it might fit a client’s lifestyle. To do so, we must understand how each client lives their lives. Are they a workaholic (like us)? Do they have kids? Where do they congregate in their home? What’s important to them? Which product features excite them the most?

Assuming the new product adds value and is a good fit, our next task is to figure out how we can make the client’s interaction with these umpteen devices less clunky and more intuitive – more tailored to the way they live. Doing this requires face time. Not the kind of face time you use on your phone. The kind that you have in person, face-to-face. 

At Koncerted, our goal is to pair great technology with good listening so we can create an easy-to-use interface that works for you and your home. We call these “scenarios”. Like “Time for Bed”, “Away on Vacation”, “Evening with the Kids”, “Mom & Dad Time”. These scenarios don’t require you to interact with 6 different pieces of smart technology but with just one button on your tablet, mobile phone or laptop that takes everything into account. Now that’s genius.
(Sorry Rosie.) 

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Building a business on trust.

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Building a business on trust.

Just because we didn’t make the mess, didn’t mean we couldn’t help clean it up. When we offered our assistance, our client asked if we could intervene so his wife wouldn’t have to argue with the cable guy – who as it turned out – was clearly to blame. We did so without hesitation, dispatching a Koncerted employee to deal with the situation

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